Gun porn

From a reader:

S&W Model of 1917 chambered in 45 ACP, one of approximately 175,000 purchased by dot-gov for WWI because M1911 production couldn’t keep up with needs of the military. A similar revolver, also called the Model of 1917 and based on the large New Service frame, was also bought from Colt by the bushel for the same reason. This example shipped to Springfield Armory on May 6, 1918, but the trail ends there and no information is known about what unit it went to, unfortunately. Blue is worn but original. The lanyard and 1918 dated I.G. (Inspector General) stamped holster are period correct. The holster appears to be left handed, but is actually right handed because the revolver was worn butt-forward, possibly a throwback to the old cavalry days.
I got this from sum-dood walking out of the gun show one afternoon as I was walking in, and got it dirt cheap because the double-action pull would not function. A buddy who knows these things real well tore it down and said it was just full of dirt and crap, giving a new meaning to “dirt cheap” and had it running like a sewing machine in no time. There’s a lesson about maintenance and ignorance there perhaps, but sometimes you just get lucky.
-H

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14 Responses to Gun porn

  1. anonymous says:

    Sweet guns those are. I have one of the late 1980’s surplus purchase Brazilian police contract guns (1937?). The bore is pretty murky from corrosive ammunition use, but it shoots a bit better than ‘plinking grade’, if you get my drift. Fantastic trigger pull, the long action S&W mechanism. I use the six shot moon clips, rather than three shot. Bonus feature – speed loader pouches and short cartridge length (in some cases) allow 2 stacked clips per pouch, doubling the load (12 shots per pouch) with no added bulk.

    For those who want fully adjustable sights on it, look for an Evans Wonder Sight assembly. They bolt on the rear plate without D&T many older revolvers. Not nearly as durable as the original, but that is the price you pay for zeroing your ammunition without damaging the original gun. Worth a look at.

    Thanks for the post.

    • H says:

      Evans Wonder Sight is actually still available, $42 + $2 shipping. If I recall correctly, these guys started making them again when all those Brazilian M1917’s hit the market about 25 years ago…and I was a dumbass for not buying one of those at the time. I was also a dumbass for not buying any of the Colt m1911 and Browning High Power pistols being brought in from Argentina when they were on the market and also a dumbass for…well….you get the picture.

      Link here to the Wonder Sight here: http://www.hollowpointmold.com/wondersight/

      • anonymous says:

        Hey, I had no idea that the sight was still available. Cool ! Thanks for the link.

        That flap holster is cool, but I’ve had few problems with a Bianchi Cyclone crossdraw holster.

  2. Nemo says:

    A friend of mine owns one of these, passed down from his Grandfather, who did a stint in WW1. His example is well maintained. Accuracy is superb. Recoil’s not bad either. Nice weapon. I asked him if he wanted to sell it to me. He laughed ;^).

  3. wildbill says:

    Mine is the most accurate revolver I’ve shot. My Colt M1917 is almost as good. Great pistols.

  4. Ray says:

    S&W did a reproduction of those a few years ago. I don’t know if they are still in production. My original M1917 is near mint and the best .45 ACP revolver I have ever fired. I like them WAY better than Colt 1917’s.

  5. David L says:

    You did very well on this one!

    I just wish that I had not sold my Brazilian Model. (College and Girls have never been cheap) So if you want a good solid close in gun fighters weapon. Than you could do a whole lot worse than this puppy. As it still has a lot of fight in it. Especially since 45 A.C.P. has a great track record on filling the morgue. (This round kept my Dad alive at the Pusan Perimeter)

    Also I would not want to be pistol whipped by this. Something you really can not do with say a Glock or Baretta . As this beast is solid steel and you could not really hurt it by hitting someone with it. Unlike some of the plastic and polymers of today’s guns.

    That and since its a revolver. One does not have to worry about the gun jamming. One just keeps pulling the trigger until one run out of ammo. I have also seen an Old sweat at the range reload and get back to work shooting with the 6 round moon clips. He was faster than you would or could believe.

    All in all a very good camp gun and a very handy thing to keep around when the Big Cloud comes around.

  6. SemperFi, 0321 says:

    Don’t forget about the .45 Auto Rim, this is the same 255 gr. Keith SWC bullet I shoot in my 1911A1. Mine are super hard cast at 260 gr and I run them hot, but nevertheless, this bullet is made for shooting in a .45 Auto Rim revolver. Give it a try.

    http://www.shootingtimes.com/ammo/ammunition_the_45_auto_rim_022811/

    • SemperFi, 0321 says:

      I forgot to add; use .45 ACP brass if you want, but look into the .45 AR load data, and make sure it’s for the M1917, and not modern S&W M25, etc.
      Why limit yourself to crappy FMJ ammo (most modern FMJ is way below even WW2 mil spec), when there are so many more SWC options available?

      • anonymous says:

        That os another advantage about .45ACP revolvers, reloaded bullet nose design is completely open, no worries about jams. So if you want to load up some ‘flying ashtray’ loads, knock yourself out !

  7. Jesse Bogan says:

    I have a 37 Brazilian contract one also. In better than average shape for one of those. Great shooting gun. Evidently the Brazilian contracts were in 2 parts, one before WW2, and one after. The Brazilians fought in Italy in WW2, so if you have an “early” contract gun, it likely saw service.

    • crazyeighter says:

      I did not know that about the Brazilians. Any idea on the serial number breakdown, mine’s 2067XX.

      I’ve got one of each, a 1917 and a Brazilian Contract and echo all the good things people here said about them.

  8. Firehand says:

    “There’s a lesson about maintenance and ignorance there”
    Oh, yeah. Days of tight money, I got son’s first rifle, a Marlin Model 60, real cheap because of that. From the look and smell of the receiver, every time it started binding up they’d put some motor oil in, and when it hit the point it just wouldn’t work anymore, they decided to sell it.

    Disassemble and flush all the crud out, lube it right, and he’s still shooting it.

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