Fucking bleeding heart liberals

Mountain lions that kill pets and livestock in Southern California will no longer be automatically targeted for death.

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife is changing the policy that granted ranchers and others automatic depredation permits for marauding cats. Now, the applicant must first try nonlethal methods to scare away or keep out the cougar, the Sacramento Bee reported Wednesday.
MORE

*****

Yeah man, they’re beautiful magnificent creatures – until they kill your fucking chihuahua or livestock or niece…..

This entry was posted in California. Bookmark the permalink.

23 Responses to Fucking bleeding heart liberals

  1. Brad says:

    I live in Northern California and we are filthy with them. They no longer fear humans. If you want a depredation permit plan on hiring an attorney. It’s a very small step from goats to children and only a matter of time. Our county has learned to SSS.

    • Paulo says:

      We practice the shoot and shovel up here on northern Vancouver Island, the most densely populated cougar habitat in existence. 4? years ago I shot a monster that had killed my sheep. I have since gotten rid of the herd as it just wasn’t worth the effort, especially since said cat tore open my shed and dragged the obese Katahdin a 100 yards, ate the guts out, and buried it under leaves. I stalked it and shot it at 20 feet as it was crouched behind a little hump…never taking its eyes off mine the whole time. I am pretty sure it was going to pounce. Anyway, I aimed just below the chin, and the cat went nuts…ballistic. I ran up to it (it took about a second) and pumped 5 more right into its side/heart from about 3 feet. The cat was so big I had to get a neighbour to help me load it into my tractor. There is nothing really to grab onto, and when you try and lift holding a leg and tail the claws come out. Anyway, into the river it went and off the sea it floated.

      The next year one broke into my neighnours place across the river. It pushed open his kitchen door and attacked one of his weimers (a pretty good sized dog). The owner fought it off and chased it out. The next morning I ran into the cat on my morning walk with my dog (Jack Russell). I picked up the dog and just backed away, and the cat headed out. A month later another neighbour shot it. It was sick and very very skinny.

      Since then (I walk lots) I always carry my .30-.30, my .410, or a knife…sometimes bear spray. I also have a walking stick with a metal point for spearing if one charges. (A 70 year old guy killed one with abuck knife just west of here). As you know handguns are illegal to carry here. In the last 10 years I have had 5 cats go through our yard that I saw, shot one, the warden snared and shot one, and my other dog treed one. Last year a lady was killed over on the west coast. her husband speared the cat. There have been lots of attacks on people. Lots. That pets disappear is a given. In the evening I always go out with my dog with a light and am very aware. When we go through the bush and down trails I always have my dog leashed. It’s just the way it is. i saw one last month on my drive to town. They are everywhere.

      Oh yeah, a good friend shot one last year while hunting. He walked into a deer kill being guarded and the cat screamed at him. He just raised his rifle and said bye bye.

      • ignore amos says:

        Correct me if I’m wrong. Didn’t B.C. outlaw hunting predators? Or was that just cute little Grizzlie Bears. Oh wait, they’ll get around to it.

  2. StBernardnot says:

    3 S Rule: Subsection .308.

  3. Exile1981 says:

    I see a rise in illegal shooting of dangerous predators or a rise in missing persons.

  4. Elmo says:

    “The policy applies to the Santa Monica and Santa Ana mountain ranges in Southern California, where small and genetically isolated populations of cougars are hemmed in by freeways and are at risk of dying out.”

    This is a lie and Fish and Game knows it. When F&G first started releasing problem Mountain Lions it was done near my family ranch, which they determined was an ideal location as it’s centrally located between three state highways. At the time of release, the F&G biologist told my neighbor that the cats would not cross busy roads.
    Six months later, the first cat they released was found almost 100 miles away. It had crossed Interstate 5 to get there. When my neighbor next spoke to that same biologist her quote was “They’re not supposed to do that”.
    They later found another cat that had also crossed a freeway to relocate.

  5. Roger says:

    Such magnificent animals with such soft eyes. I cannot imagine how anyone would not want to cuddle up with one and scratch its belly until it purrs like the big kitten it is.

  6. Aesop says:

    They’re not endangered. Not even close.

    No permit just means you can’t get it stuffed and mounted afterwards.

    Well…okay.

    No idea how it died, sir. Maybe from fright. Saw the tracks, found a blood trail, but never did see a carcass.

    • Bad_Brad says:

      “They’re not endangered. Not even close.”

      When you consider their range I think a case could be made that they are overpopulated. At least in California anyways. About a year ago Cal DFG announced with lots of fan fair that a wolf had been spotted in extreme Northern California. That was bull shit. They have a couple packs as far south as Shasta County. And they are killing livestock. Fun Fun.

      • Aesop says:

        Yeah, well.
        That’ll end, soon enough.

        Back in the 80s doing undergrad marine bio, it was noted that the sea otter population from Monterey Bay abruptly ended just about the point up the coast that a commercial abalone fisherman’s boat would reach on 1/2 a tank of gas coming up from Santa Barbara.

        Damnedest coincidence ever, huh?

        Wolves will go the same way.
        If DFG swears they can’t be here, then it’s obviously impossible for anyone to shoot them here, now isn’t it?

        With the pending lead ammo ban for hunting statewide, I give that condor population less than a decade before it all goes away too.
        Sh*t happens.

  7. wildbill says:

    They are beautiful, and look good in zoos, where they belong, if you’re not going to cull the aggressive ones.

  8. Sword of the Lictor says:

    reintroduce grizzly bears to Sacramento. 2 birds, one stone.

  9. pigpen51 says:

    Here in Michigan, the DNR fought for several years to say that we had no single cougar/panther/mt.lion/puma in the entire state, upper or lower. Residents began to see them a few years ago, and reported it, and the DNR called them basically liars, or idiots, who were seeing bobcats. Well, my son walked within 10 yards of one in the Hesperia, MI area, and one was killed by a car near Baldwin, MI. In the last three years. And now with trail cameras everywhere, they have pictures of them all the hell over the place. The DNR is not an agency concerned with wildlife, but rather politics and tourism. I am not sure of the state of the cats here in MI, but I know that if I see one, and it is near a populated area, I will shoot it. They are just too dangerous. We have a huge black bear explosion going on right now as well, that the DNR is not willing to admit to. I am waiting for the first human interaction with one. Several farmers have had livestock killed by them.

    • M. Sage says:

      Heh. I know two people who I trust that saw mountain lions in the lower peninsula over a decade ago. DNR are a bunch of idiots.

      • One of the many Bills says:

        I live in Leelanau County Michigan. My neighbor has pictures on his trail cam. They are alive and well here in my area.

    • Eric Chase says:

      Being a life long resident of michigan (other than my stint working for the uniformed side of uncle sam) i can say with some authority DNR is full of shit and wouldnt know one of these cats if it was eating there guts

  10. mbob says:

    Sounds like the native population is taking their country back. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if it turned out one of their preferred food groups was illegals.

  11. Mike says:

    Looks like I ‘m in the definite minority here but I like having the wild animals out there. Granted it’s a pain in the ass to lock my hens up each night to keep the raccoons from killing them and small neighborhood dogs occasioally disappear at night as well as the domestic cats that go prowling at night. I suspect coyotes are responsible but cougars have been spotted and my neighbor two doors down shot a bear in his garbage can this past spring. I live east of Tacoma, WA right on the edge of the burbs about where the Cascade foothills start.

    My biggest complaint is deer hunting used to be an easy tag to fill until a few years ago when hunting cats with dogs became illegal. Now there a lot of cats and deer are damn skittish and pretty thin on the ground. I’ll take the trade because, for me anyway, seeing a cat is a real treat. As far as folk’s livestock is concerned, it’s probably time to go back to the old ways and make sure they’re watched in the daytime and locked up at night. A good dog will also be important.

    As a kid my absolute favorite catalog was the Herter’s Catalog. I spent hours reading and studying all the things I wanted but couldn’t afford. Every page had the saying, “Man cannot survive where wildlife cannot live.” That’s always stuck with me.

    • wes says:

      I hate to call you out but this

      ” As far as folk’s livestock is concerned, it’s probably time to go back to the old ways and make sure they are watched in the daytime and locked up at night”

      sounds like it’s coming from someone who has never spent an appreciable amount of time on a working farm or ranch.

      Just where in the hell are you going to find the and space to do this. This might work for someone that has six hens in the back yard or a goat eating blackberry bushes on the hillside but try doing this for livestock on open range or even winter pasture and it just isn’t going to work. Even if a person was willing to try you aren’t going to have enough men to make it happen and there’s only about a thousand other things that need doing with that same time.

      Space wise it would take one heck of a large building to provide a completely secure “locked up at night” facility and then you are introducing a whole host of other problems arising from having a large amount of stock crammed into tight quarters.

      No, you only have to find one heifer on her side with her nose and half her ass chewed away and a dead, half eaten calf hanging out of her to help you decide damn quick that that those cute ‘cats’, coyotes and feral dogs deserve the lead pill treatment.

      wes

  12. Fred Z says:

    I have a cottage in the East Kootenays.

    I had it for nearly 20 years before the neighbours trusted me enough to explain that shooting bears who are harmlessly wandering about or passing thru is frowned on, but that bears who get too close to people or wreck crops get ruthlessly shot.

    One got past an electric wire barrier and over a 10 foot steel mesh fence and into my apple and pear orchard two years ago.

    Justice was done.

  13. EDC says:

    I too am ibe cleaned up.n Northern Ca. We had them walking the streets in broad daylight. I always though if the bunny huggers love the “little kittys” so much, lets give them some. Trap and release a few breeding pairs and release them in Golden Gate Park, Downtown L.A. and any other place that has an over abundance of prey (homeless) . We would lose less livestock and pets around here and the larger cities could be cleaned up.

Comments are welcome. Trolls will be banned and then shot.