It’s been a great day

-Lone Raven Ranch

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11 Responses to It’s been a great day

  1. Alan says:

    Wow! Wish I knew your coyote hunting technique.

  2. rayvet says:

    I read somewhere about this being commonly done out west. The person writing about it (seemed knowledgeable about yotes) didn’t know if it was a deterrent to other yotes in the area or some type of braggadocios reason to show how many the ranchers had killed. Either way, I’d like to drive a PETA person by one of those fence lines.

    • Wirecutter says:

      It’s not much of a deterrent. I’ve driven past fences like that and saw coyotes feeding on the ones hanging there.

    • Larry says:

      Just outside a now “discovered by Californians” Montana city, a rancher had lost a calf one night, and stayed out the next with a rifle. Just after dawn, 2 or 3 dogs (can’t remember) were going after some more cheap thrills when he shot them. He hung the bodies from the road entrance to the ranch. New neighbors from California were appalled, and tried to bring charges because of course their sweet dogs would never do anything like that. The sheriff told them in future, keep their dogs penned or chained up or indoors, and that they were damned lucky they weren’t being sued by the rancher, but only because there was no way (back then) to prove their dogs had killed the one calf and injured another. Fucking idiots.

  3. Andy says:

    It is also a way for the gubment man to know how to pay the property owner. Wish I had the photos of my Mom’s uncle from back in the day when he was a government trapper. Photos upon photos of thousands of yote hides hanging on barns and trees and such. All out in the west Texas desert.

  4. SDH says:

    Nothing say a great day like a truck full of coyotes.

    http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/2013/12/caption-contest-4.html

  5. One Two says:

    It’s not much of a deterrent. I’ve driven past fences like that and saw coyotes feeding on the ones hanging there.

    That’s called “an opportunity to legally shoot over bait.”

  6. Sanders says:

    I’ve posted it on here before, but we used to hang them on the fences by cattle guards to keep cows from milling around and figuring out how to walk the guard or jump over it.

    Plus we liked the shock value on the city folks who drove out there.

Play nice.