Why the fuck do people do this shit?

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23 Responses to Why the fuck do people do this shit?

  1. Bad_Brad says:

    Libtard. Looks like there’s some current swinging into those rocks. Ambush point for big fish. I’d be fishing.

  2. Steve in CA says:

    Because they can!

  3. Spiro says:

    Balancing rocks, never seen that before, I don’t have a clue.

  4. Rickvid in Seattle says:

    Because it’s there…

  5. arc says:

    Hes in the moment and possibly just bored with nothing better to to. Might want to leave a non-destructive mark saying “Someone was here”. At least hes no on a cellphone!

    On a side note, I was hiking around on one of my neighbors land, metal detecting, and noticed ~1 day old boot prints on the ground and followed them. His hunting trails are nice and cleared, so I left a small but curious, unnaturally stacked pile of rocks on one of the trails. A corny but non-destructive way of saying someone had walked the trail.

  6. IslandGirl says:

    Dunno. But the clueless touri (plural of “tourist”) and the hapless hippies do a lot of that here on the Big Island as some sort of tribute to Pele or some shit like that.

    We go to the beach and gleefully knock them down, and laugh in the faces of the people who try to stop us.

    At Volcano National Park, they actively crusade against stacking rocks, because the ancient Hawaiians used stacked lava rocks as sign posts, and now with the stupid people doing the same thing, it’s impossible to tell what’s an archaeologically significant pile of rocks and what’s just a stupid tourist/hippy pile of rocks.

    • Wirecutter says:

      I just never could see the reasoning behind it myself.
      Up in the Sierras, especially on the eastern slope, the Basque sheepherders have been doing it for generations and they call them stone boys, but theirs are more of a pillar than just a single column of rocks. Those I don’t mind, because it has something to do with their culture, not just some idiot doing it to impress another idiot.

  7. alex mason says:

    Mental Retardation.

  8. Eastwood says:

    Rock bear is wondering the same thing.

  9. Mark says:

    It’s what you do instead of being productive.

  10. Sanders says:

    Rock stackers are everywhere. I go 4-wheeling on trails from Southern New Mexico to Southern Colorado, where I am now in Silverton, getting ready to head out to do some old mining roads. I’ll guarantee that I will see several stacks of rocks along the way – and not claim markers, either. I caught some dudes stacking rocks on my dash cam on Black Bear Road a few years ago.

    • =TW= says:

      Silverton is one of my favorite places. I camp at Little Molas Lake, and hit the Miner’s Tavern for drinks. Some camping and N.F. access North of town on 550 towards Ouray too. 4WD trails galore in the mountains around there. Scenery on the Million Dollar Highway is hard to beat.

      • Sanders says:

        I came up to run Poughkeepsie Gulch this trip, as I’d missed last time I was up here. Figured I’d go down it first, then climb back up. But just past Como Lake, there was a locked gate across the road and a proclamation from the Forest Service saying it was closed due to an uncleared avalanche and folks making a trail around it, creating “resource destruction”.

        So, I went back out and drove around Placer and Picayune Gulches, then Eureka. There was an avalanche on the road to Animas Forks the county had carved passage through. The snow was still over 10 ft. deep on both sides with trees sticking out of it everywhere. Had a small tree fall out as I passed by it. Glad it wasn’t a big one.

        This was a “glamping” trip for my wife. We stayed at the Teller House hotel, an old Victorian style place – but they had WiFi! No TV in the rooms. Private baths only in certain rooms, too. So far, my favorite watering hole/place to eat is Handlebars.

        Did go do Blackbear. Figured there’d be too many people out there. It is really best to come up here during the week. It is the first time I’ve come up on a weekend, and there are just too dang many people out on those trails.

        Oh yeah, saw plenty of stacked rocks, as I knew I would.

  11. Gone fishin’ says:

    Real men hunt, fish, hike, or four (or two) wheel. Super fags play with rocks (geologists excepted, of course)

  12. BillDave says:

    It is a issue at Big Bend. Carins were used to mark trails, but these jerk have them everywhere,

  13. =TW= says:

    While backpacking on the Muir Trail we would sometimes see stacks of rocks to mark the trail. We called them “ducks.”

  14. larryw says:

    A stack of rocks (not found in nature) is a good way to mark the shooting point when tracking a downed animal. Or to identify someone with too much time on his hands.

  15. Skipperdaddy says:

    If ya see me stacking some rocks its best to turn and walk quietly in other direction.

  16. DaveP. says:

    There used to be a variant of the hobo sign code made by stacking rocks up instead of scratching sign on walls. Sometimes you’d see it near railroad tracks. I haven’t seen it since the ’80s, though, so it may have died out.

  17. Paraclete says:

    Went Deer hunting several years ago on GMA.
    Came upon several places where multiple stones were piled upon one another.
    It was actually quite spooky to see in the middle of no-where.
    It’s the enviro’s who’re doing it. Some sort of marker to their earth god or something.

Play nice.