173rd Airborne LRRP Ranger & Attack Helicopter Crews

From the comments by one of the readers:

At the 8:48 spot is CPT Tom Roy, Captain (retired Colonel) Roy was on his second tour in RVN assigned to Casper Flight of the 173rd Airborne. His first tour was as a warrant officer in the 170th AHC in the “Buccaneers” gun platoon out of Pleiku in the Central Highlands. Our gun platoon, call sign “Cobras”,of the 129th AHC (wasn’t mentioned in the video) assumed duties of gun support shared with our sister company gun platoon “Star Blazers,” of the 61st AHC, after the 335th AHC stood down. Tom was then Assistant Platoon Leader for the Casper Flight which was the 173rd Airborne’s organic Huey and Loach support aviation company. When they stood down, CPT Roy, who had too little second tour time in country to DEROS, came down to our company and joined our gun platoon, immediately becoming an aircraft commander fire team leader due to his previous experience. I had the privilege of flying Tom’s wing for the remaining 8 or so months of our respective tours. Tom picked up the individual callsign “Regent” because he was the finest Charlie/Mike Model gun pilot in country. Cobra Regent and Cobra Alemaster frequently flew as a light fire team. Regent was the most aggressive Lead I knew and was constantly trying to sniff out trouble. Despite his aggressiveness, I always believed that my crew and I would survive when flying his wing because he was just so damn good. What little success I had as a gun pilot and later in my Army career, I directly attribute to (then) CPT Tom “Cobra Regent” Roy.
Regards, Alemaster

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11 Responses to 173rd Airborne LRRP Ranger & Attack Helicopter Crews

  1. bogsidebunny says:

    At least the bottom left grunt didn’t have to waste valuable government grease paint.

  2. Duke says:

    What the! …. looks like those mofos is wearing black-face.

  3. Alemaster says:

    At the 8:48 spot is CPT Tom Roy, Captain (retired Colonel) Roy was on his second tour in RVN assigned to Casper Flight of the 173rd Airborne. His first tour was as a warrant officer in the 170th AHC in the “Buccaneers” gun platoon out of Pleiku in the Central Highlands. Our gun platoon, call sign “Cobras”,of the 129th AHC (wasn’t mentioned in the video) assumed duties of gun support shared with our sister company gun platoon “Star Blazers,” of the 61st AHC, after the 335th AHC stood down. Tom was then Assistant Platoon Leader for the Casper Flight which was the 173rd Airborne’s organic Huey and Loach support aviation company. When they stood down, CPT Roy, who had too little second tour time in country to DEROS, came down to our company and joined our gun platoon, immediately becoming an aircraft commander fire team leader due to his previous experience. I had the privilege of flying Tom’s wing for the remaining 8 or so months of our respective tours. Tom picked up the individual callsign “Regent” because he was the finest Charlie/Mike Model gun pilot in country. Cobra Regent and Cobra Alemaster frequently flew as a light fire team. Regent was the most aggressive Lead I knew and was constantly trying to sniff out trouble. Despite his aggressiveness, I always believed that my crew and I would survive when flying his wing because he was just so damn good. What little success I had as a gun pilot and later in my Army career, I directly attribute to (then) CPT Tom “Cobra Regent” Roy. regards, Alemaster

    • Wirecutter says:

      This comment’s too good to keep here in the comments. I’m adding it to the post.
      Thank you.

      • Alemaster says:

        Thanks Wirecutter, you are too kind with your comments. When Regent strapped on a gunship he was one bad dude, stone cold fearless killer. Prior to him joining the 129th AHC and before The Casper Flight stood down, when not supporting the Korean Tiger Division, we primarily supported the “November” Rangers, LRRP, when it was our turn to RON at LZ English and support “The ‘Herd.” The LRRPs were fearless and, IMHO, the finest light infantry in the world. I was, and still am, proud to have been a small part of their mission accomplishments. I have many war stories about firing for the “November” LRRPs, some of them true. All better men than me. regards, again, Alemaster

    • Inbred Redneck says:

      Alemaster- guys I’ve known who were 173rd/LRRPs always struck me as the real deal. They and the Wolfhounds got to talk the talk ’cause they’d walked the walk already. Anybody who was over there knows how it was in their area but when you got to talk to other guys you got the feelin’ that some of what you did yourself was almost a picnic (at times). Havin’ been MRF, I got nothin’ but respect for the Navy guys who ran us around the Delta. I know a lot of ’em never joined to be River Rats but they sure saw a lot of shit. I always figured that after some of those E5s who ran their own boats had been there for awhile, they had no interest in anybody from Officer Country tellin’ ’em what to do, unless it was somebody who’d been there and done that. If a guy made Lt. he might be okay, and Warrants knew their shit. Heaven help you if you ran into an Ensign Parker type.

  4. Eod1sg Ret says:

    173rd, the most decorated unit in the U. S. military. My son jumped into north Iraq with them in 03. Last of the no shit bad motherfuckers. Sorry to hear about your dog, Kenny.

  5. Brooks says:

    Currently re-reading “Dead Center” by Ed Kugler
    “A raw, straightforward, and powerful account of his two years
    as a Marine scout sniper in Vietnam. Who picked up his bush
    skills while attached to 3rd Force Recon Company.”
    Previous to this re-read was “The Ether Zone” by R.C. Morris
    Both, are excellent accounts of the silent hero’s who have balls
    of steel and the determination of a Pit Bull.
    I started off in the nineties reading Richard Marcinko.
    After reading a few of those, I figured there must be better.
    So I sought out real first hand accounts of the Men who would
    share their experiences. The books which I’ve read over these
    last twenty years or so, bring to light the raw courage of these
    unique warriors. The chopper pilots to the medics. The LRRP’s
    to the snipers. All of them, and those who supported them,
    deserve ALL the honor and respect that can presented.
    Even though they’ll humbly say, “We were only doing our job”
    Yes, they were, a job that Very Few people could do/or even handle.
    The recounting of their heroic events will keep you on the edge of
    your seat. And they’re books will hard to put down.
    I encourage everyone to seek out the “real accounts” of journals and
    diaries of theses fearless warriors and honor them by keeping their
    memories alive by reading their books.
    One of the best, was one of the first which I found on my quest for
    real first hand accounts. “Platoon Leader” by James R. McDonough
    1985 Bantam Books. Sadly, most likely long out of print now.
    As you begin reading their accounts you’ll fast learn how to tell the
    difference between those who we’re actually there and those who’re just
    saying they were. Also, you’ll notice a wide range of writing and
    abilities to share their accounts. Some tell it like it was straight
    forward, down and dirty. Others were gifted with better vocabularies.
    But it shouldn’t matter to the reader of these private memories which
    few ever hear about. We should be grateful to them for their willingness
    to share. When they do share, it’s not about themselves, but the guys
    which they served with.
    Grateful Patriots salute the men and women of the Vietnam era.
    An era so misunderstood due to propaganda of the left.
    Thankfully we have their own words to set all accounts straight.
    Of how they shared of themselves…for us.
    The words of those who’re willing to share, just one more time.

    • Wirecutter says:

      I’ve read every one of the books you mentioned and more. Matter of fact, first person accounts of war are about the only thing I read.

  6. nines says:

    I love every single last one of them for as long as my particles remain in the cosmos anywhere. I wish I could plant a little memory bot here so you’d know how much.

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