I just jizzed a little

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26 Responses to I just jizzed a little

  1. Tsquared says:

    Wow, I have a few dozen 1 oz. bars and some 10 oz bars I have picked up over the years but I have never seen anything over the 35 lb bar that they keep at Ft Knox. I did the tour there but was unable to take a sample home.

  2. WKWilson says:

    Probably have a hard time carrying it very far , but if you have a hand truck.

  3. Rickvid in Seattle says:

    I have heard, but will not bet the family fortune, that all the gold ever discovered would be a block 150 feet by 150 feet. (Anyone know better?) If so, that bar reresents a damned goodly tranch of the whole meshpucha!

  4. Elmo says:

    If I read that right, that’s a 250,000 gram ingot, which equals 8,818.491 ounces which at today’s price of $1,554.94 per ounce equals $12,830,375.30.
    Wouldn’t that fit into your gun safe nicely?

    • Wirecutter says:

      You’d need a heavy duty dolly to haul that sucker home.

      • Al_in_Ottawa says:

        Bullion is sold in Troy ounces (oz t) which are slightly heavier than Avoirdupois ounces that everyone is familiar with. A Troy ounce is 31.103 grams versus 28.349 for the Avoirdupois. If someone tries to sell you a 28gram gold or silver coin he’s scamming you.

        In 250Kg there are 8,064.52 Troy ounces so the value is $12,539,838.71 at $1,554.94/oz

        Years ago at a gold mine in British Columbia there was a large ingot on display placed on a flat table with raised edges to prevent the bar being pushed off the table. Anyone who could pick it up with their bare hands would own it. No one ever did.

        By the way, you must have slipped a digit when multiplying, 8818.491 x 1554.94 = 13,712,224.39. I couldn’t figure out why the difference between our two totals was so small until I checked the math.

        • Elmo says:

          Thanks for the good info and for keeping me honest, Al. I was familiar with troy ounces and I reckon I just assumed they were the ounces I was familiar with. Boy, was I wrong.

          It looks like a Troy ounce is about 10% heavier than the ounces I’m familiar with. Thinking in those terms will make it easier for me to remember.

          • Wirecutter says:

            I always hated trying to do the conversion when I was prospecting/mining.

            • Elmo says:

              I was never in on the buying and selling of gold so I just plain never thought about it.

              I are getting smarter all the time, thanks to Knuckledraggin.

      • G.W. Long says:

        665 Toy pounds would be about 600 pounds. Not too many folks could pick it up and run out the door. I think it is safe to say they could insure it right where it sits.

        • pigpen51 says:

          I worked in a steel melt factory for over 35 years. I did every single job over the years there, including a stint in the lab. One job was weighing up heats for remelt. That involved weighing lots of incoming scrap from customers, along with virgin material, to meet the specs as required by the customers we would sell the metal to.
          There was a slug from one of their furnaces that they had returned to us to be remelted and processed to sell back to them. It was in a tub, and I could not get a chain or a v belt from a set of pulleys around it, with a large washer in the middle to close it down, to lift it with a hoist. So I picked it up by hand and put it into the other tub on the scale, for weighing. It weighed over 300#. I never did something that stupid again. Even though I was pretty young, in my late 20’s, and strong, I had been in a car accident at the age of 20 and broken my back and pelvis. So the stupid things like that I did in my youth, have now caught up with me, and my back hurts every day.
          When I was in school, even in high school, and my parents would complain about how their bodies hurt, or they would groan when getting up from the couch, I couldn’t really understand it. I understand it now. Now, if I get down on the floor, I hurt when I try and get back up, while in high school playing football, I would knock someone down, with a really cool tackle, and while that guy would be messed up and staggering, I would pop up like nothing.
          They say that youth is wasted on the young. I now understand what they mean. And the saying about all the gold mined fitting in a box only 150 feet square, I have also heard that one. I think that it must be true and the reason why gold is so very valuable. Plus now it has so many very useful properties, in electronics, especially in the high end computers, where other metals just won’t suffice.
          Metals like lithium are also very valuable, for use in batteries, and are abundant in the country of, you guessed it, Afghanistan. We didn’t go there and stay there fighting an unwinnable war for nearly 2 decades simply due to our humane hearts. Remember, always follow the money.

  5. Krugerrand says:

    250 kilograms, or 550 lbs, roughly $13 million if I calculated right. It would probably break the struts in my Camry trying to drive it home. I’d rather have 250 “A” shares of Berkshire Hathaway. At least you can sell one of those and trade up for a new car.

    • Cederq says:

      I have a C3500 Chevy P/U, I could carry that and a couple of it’s cousins. In fact being winter in the northern states I have about 700 pounds of tube sand back there now for traction.

  6. Bad_Brad says:

    Shit, it took a while for the jpeg to come up. I thought for sure it was a bad ass 1911.

  7. SgtBob says:

    An Arkansas friend of my wife said her never-married great aunt died, and when the family was going through the house, they found in a closet a stack of small gold bars, a little less than knee high. She did not say how many bars were in the stack, but it certainly was more than two dozen.

  8. ggodmulS says:

    I’d still rather have my ex-girlfriend back – live on a farm – and impregnate her at least ten times.

  9. Curtis says:

    Mine are quite a bit larger than that.

  10. RickeyG says:

    With a Mitsubishi logo on it…

  11. Sanders says:

    I was going through some old photos the other day and found one of me holding a 640 oz. cone-shaped gold ingot in the vault at a mine in Ruth, Nevada, outside Ely. It was ready to go out for refining. You could see red copper streaks in it.

  12. Burgess Schnitzius says:

    The bar is marked as 250,000 grams at 47.039 a gram the value is $11,759,737

  13. crazyeighter says:

    If I’d known I was gonna last this long, I’da taken better care of myself.

Play nice.